Genetic lineages of Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky spreading in pet reptiles
PBN-AR
Instytucja
Państwowy Instytut Weterynaryjny - Państwowy Instytut Badawczy
Informacje podstawowe
Główny język publikacji
en
Czasopismo
VETERINARY MICROBIOLOGY
ISSN
0378-1135
EISSN
Wydawca
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
DOI
URL
Rok publikacji
2013
Numer zeszytu
3-4
Strony od-do
686-689
Numer tomu
166
Identyfikator DOI
Liczba arkuszy
Autorzy
Pozostali autorzy
+ 1
Autorzy przekładu
(liczba autorów przekładu: 0)
Słowa kluczowe
en
Salmonella Kentucky ST198
Reptile
Antimicrobial susceptibility testing
PFGE
MLST
Streszczenia
Język
en
Treść
The purpose of the study was to define genetic diversity of reptilian Salmonella enterica serovar (S.) Kentucky isolates and their epidemiological relations to the ones from poultry, food, and environmental origin in Poland. Between 2010 and 2012 twenty-four S. Kentucky isolates derived from snakes (N = 8), geckos (N = 7), chameleons (N = 4), agamas (N = 1), lizard (N = 1), and environmental swabs taken from reptile exhibition (N = 3) were identified. They were characterized with antimicrobial minimal inhibitory concentration testing, XbaI–PFGE and MLST typing. The profiles compared to S. Kentucky available in BioNumerics local laboratory database (N = 40) showed 67.3% of relatedness among reptile isolates. Three genetic lineages were defined. The first lineage gathered 20 reptile isolates with 83.4% of similarity and wild-type MICs for all antimicrobials tested but streptomycin in single case. The remaining three reptilian and one post-exhibition environment S. Kentucky isolates were clustered (87.2%) with isolates originating from poultry, mainly turkey, food, and environment and presented variable non-wild type MICs to numerous antimicrobials. The third S. Kentucky lineage was composed of two isolates from feed (96.3%). The results suggest diverse sources and independent routes of infection. Most of the isolates belonged to reptile-associated clones spread both horizontally and vertically. Simultaneously, PFGE profiles and MLST type indistinguishable from the ones observed in poultry point out carnivore reptiles as possible vector of infection with multidrug and high-level ciprofloxacin resistant (MIC ≥ 8 mg/L) S. Kentucky. Public awareness and education are required to prevent potential reptile-associated S. Kentucky infections in humans.
Cechy publikacji
praca doświadczalna
Inne
System-identifier
552692
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