Distribution pattern and number of ticks on lizards
PBN-AR
Instytucja
Instytut Ochrony Przyrody Polskiej Akademii Nauk
Informacje podstawowe
Główny język publikacji
angielski
Czasopismo
Ticks and Tick-Borne Diseases
ISSN
1877-959X
EISSN
1877-9603
Wydawca
Elsevier
DOI
URL
Rok publikacji
2015
Numer zeszytu
1
Strony od-do
172–179
Numer tomu
7
Identyfikator DOI
Liczba arkuszy
1,12
Autorzy
(liczba autorów: 6)
Pozostali autorzy
+ 5
Autorzy przekładu
(liczba autorów przekładu: 0)
Słowa kluczowe
EN
Lacerta agilis
ectoparasites
distribution
Ixodes ricinus
dead ticks
Open access
Tryb otwartego dostępu
Inne
Wersja tekstu w otwartym dostępie
Licencja otwartego dostępu
Inna
Czas opublikowania w otwartym dostępie
Streszczenia
Język
EN
Treść
The success of ectoparasites depends primarily on the site of attachment and body condition of their hosts. Ticks usually tend to aggregate on vertebrate hosts in specific areas, but the distribution pattern may depend on host body size and condition, sex, life stage or skin morphology. Here, we studied the distribution of ticks on lizards and tested the following hypotheses: occurrence or high abundance of ticks is confined with body parts with smaller scales and larger interscalar length because such sites should provide ticks with superior attachment conditions. This study was performed in field conditions in central Poland in 2008-2011. In total, 500 lizards (Lacerta agilis) were caught and 839 ticks (Ixodes ricinus, larvae and nymphs) were collected from them. Using generalized linear mixed models, we found that the ticks were most abundant on forelimbs and their axillae, with 90% of ticks attached there. This part of the lizard body and the region behind the hindlimb were covered by the smallest scales with relatively wide gaps between them. This does not fully support our hypothesis that ticks prefer locations with easy access to skin between scales, because it does not explain why so few ticks were in the hindlimb area. We found that the abundance of ticks was positively correlated with lizard body size index (snout-vent length). Tick abundance was also higher in male and mature lizards than in female and young individuals. Autotomy had no effect on tick abundance. We found no correlation between tick size and lizard morphology, sex, autotomy and body size index. The probability of occurrence of dead ticks was positively linked with the total number of ticks on the lizard but there was no relationship between dead tick presence and lizard size, sex or age. Thus lizard body size and sex are the major factors affecting the abundance of ticks, and these parasites are distributed nearly exclusively on the host's forelimbs and their axillae.
Inne
System-identifier
PX-56b463bc8106eb71826e44bf
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