Free-living snakes as a source and possible vector of Salmonella spp. and parasites
PBN-AR
Instytucja
Państwowy Instytut Weterynaryjny - Państwowy Instytut Badawczy
Informacje podstawowe
Główny język publikacji
EN
Czasopismo
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH
ISSN
1612-4642
EISSN
1439-0574
Wydawca
SPRINGER
Rok publikacji
2016
Numer zeszytu
2
Strony od-do
161-166
Numer tomu
62
Identyfikator DOI
Liczba arkuszy
Autorzy przekładu
(liczba autorów przekładu: 0)
Słowa kluczowe
en
Salmonella spp
Alaria spp
Wildlife
European snakes
Vector-borne diseases
Epidemiology
Streszczenia
Język
en
Treść
Free-living snakes may carry a broad range of pathogens that differ considerably by geographical locations and source species. The biological role of wildlife snakes for transmission of bacteria and helminths is hardly explored. The purpose of the study was a snapshot on the zoonotic agents load in free-living snakes found dead in a landscape park in central Poland. A total of 16 dead free-living snakes identified as European grass snake (Natrix natrix, N = 15) and a smooth snake (Coronella austriaca, N = 1) were tested. Abdominal organs were used for bacteriological testing, whereas, parasites were searched for in the remaining carcasses. Fourteen (87.5 %) individuals were positive for Salmonella spp., whereas, trematodes were found in 13 out of 16 samples (81.3 %). A total of 33 isolates representing 11 Salmonella serovars or antigenic forms were observed with Salmonella enterica subsp. diarizonae (IIIb) 38:r:z being the most frequent. The trematodes were recognized as Alaria alata mesocercariae (Distomum musculorum suis, DMS). Additionally, unidentified nematodes were detected in four samples. No Yersinia spp. and Mycobacterium spp. were found. The results indicate huge burden of Salmonella spp. and muscle parasites carriage by snakes present in the natural environment and indicate possible zoonotic and epidemiological impact. It justifies our concept of free-living snakes as possible source and vector of pathogens, especially for omnivores and scavengers foraging on snake corpses. Finding of rare and diverse Salmonella serovars and unidentified nematodes proves the need for in-depth studies and systematic approach to reveal the role of free-living reptiles in epidemiology of infectious agents.
Cechy publikacji
praca doświadczalna
Inne
System-identifier
895
CrossrefMetadata from Crossref logo
Cytowania
Liczba prac cytujących tę pracę
Brak danych
Referencje
Liczba prac cytowanych przez tę pracę
Brak danych