Obesity and obesogenic growth are both highly heritable and modified by diet in a nonhuman primate model, the African green monkey (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus)
PBN-AR
Instytucja
Instytut Chemii Bioorganicznej Polskiej Akademii Nauk
Informacje podstawowe
Główny język publikacji
en
Czasopismo
International Journal of Obesity (45pkt w roku publikacji)
ISSN
0307-0565
EISSN
1476-5497
Wydawca
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
DOI
URL
Rok publikacji
2017
Numer zeszytu
Strony od-do
Numer tomu
2017
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(liczba autorów: 10)
Pozostali autorzy
+ 9
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(liczba autorów przekładu: 0)
Słowa kluczowe
en
obesogenic growth
nonhuman primates
heritability
maternal effects
development
obesity
genome-wide linkage
Open access
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Creative Commons — Uznanie autorstwa
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Streszczenia
Język
en
Treść
OBJECTIVE: In humans, the ontogeny of obesity throughout the life course and the genetics underlying it has been historically difficult to study. We compared, in a non-human primate model, the lifelong growth trajectories of obese and non-obese adults, to assess the heritability of and map potential genomic regions implicated in growth and obesity. STUDY POPULATION: A total of 905 African green monkeys, or vervets (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus) (472 females, 433 males) from a pedigreed captive colony. MEASUREMENTS AND METHODS: We measured fasted body weight (BW), crown-to-rump length (CRL), body-mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) from 2000 to 2015. We used a longitudinal clustering algorithm to detect obesogenic growth, and logistic growth curves implemented in nonlinear mixed effects models to estimate three growth parameters. We used maximum likelihood variance decomposition methods to estimate the genetic contributions to obesity-related traits and growth parameters, including a test for the effects of a calorie-restricted dietary intervention. We used multipoint linkage analysis to map implicated genomic regions. RESULTS: All measurements were significantly influenced by sex, and with the exception of WC, also influenced by maternal and post-natal diet. Chronic obesity outcomes were significantly associated with a pattern of extended growth duration with slow growth rates for BW. After accounting for environmental influences, all measurements were found to have a significant genetic component to variability. Linkage analysis revealed several regions suggested to be linked to obesity-related traits are also implicated in human obesity and metabolic disorders. CONCLUSIONS: As in humans, growth patterns in vervets have a significant impact on adult obesity and are largely under genetic control with some evidence for maternal and dietary programming. These results largely mirror findings from human research, but reflect shorter developmental periods, suggesting that the vervet offers a strong genetic model for elucidating the ontogeny of human obesity.International Journal of Obesity accepted article preview online, 06 December 2017. doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.301.
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System-identifier
PX-5a688b2cd5de7102b029046a
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