A Stretch of Negatively Charged Amino Acids of Linker for Activation of T-Cell Adaptor Has a Dual Role in T-Cell Antigen Receptor Intracellular Signaling
PBN-AR
Instytucja
Instytut Immunologii i Terapii Doświadczalnej im. Ludwika Hirszfelda Polskiej Akademii Nauk
Informacje podstawowe
Główny język publikacji
angielski
Czasopismo
Frontiers in Immunology (35pkt w roku publikacji)
ISSN
1664-3224
EISSN
Wydawca
Frontiers Media
DOI
Rok publikacji
2018
Numer zeszytu
Strony od-do
115
Numer tomu
9
Identyfikator DOI
Liczba arkuszy
Autorzy
(liczba autorów: 10)
Pozostali autorzy
+ 9
Autorzy przekładu
(liczba autorów przekładu: 0)
Słowa kluczowe
angielski
LAT
TCR
CD3
signaling
Lck
Open access
Tryb otwartego dostępu
Inne
Wersja tekstu w otwartym dostępie
Wersja opublikowana
Licencja otwartego dostępu
Creative Commons — Uznanie autorstwa
Czas opublikowania w otwartym dostępie
Razem z publikacją
Streszczenia
Język
angielski
Treść
The adaptor protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) has an essential role transducing activatory intracellular signals coming from the TCR/CD3 complex. Previous reports have shown that upon T-cell activation, LAT interacts with the tyrosine kinase Lck, leading to the inhibition of its kinase activity. LAT-Lck interaction seemed to depend on a stretch of negatively charged amino acids in LAT. Here, we have substituted this segment of LAT between amino acids 113 and 126 with a non-charged segment and expressed the mutant LAT (LAT-NIL) in J. CaM2 cells in order to analyze TCR signaling. Substitution of this segment in LAT prevented the activation-induced interaction with Lck. Moreover, cells expressing this mutant form of LAT showed a statistically significant increase of proximal intracellular signals such as phosphorylation of LAT in tyrosine residues 171 and 191, and also enhanced ZAP70 phosphorylation approaching borderline statistical significance (p = 0.051). Nevertheless, downstream signals such as Ca2+ influx or MAPK pathways were partially inhibited. Overall, our data reveal that LAT-Lck interaction constitutes a key element regulating proximal intracellular signals coming from the TCR/CD3 complex.
Cechy publikacji
artykuł oryginalny
Inne
System-identifier
PX-5b210457d5de79ce9d020e42
CrossrefMetadata from Crossref logo
Cytowania
Liczba prac cytujących tę pracę
Brak danych
Referencje
Liczba prac cytowanych przez tę pracę
Brak danych