Social Workers’ Perceptions of the Association Between Role Playing Games and Psychopathology
PBN-AR
Instytucja
Wydział Nauk Społecznych (Katolicki Uniwersytet Lubelski Jana Pawła II w Lublinie)
Informacje podstawowe
Główny język publikacji
angielski
Czasopismo
PSYCHIATRIC QUARTERLY (20pkt w roku publikacji)
ISSN
0033-2720
EISSN
1573-6709
Wydawca
SPRINGER
DOI
URL
Rok publikacji
2018
Numer zeszytu
1
Strony od-do
213-218
Numer tomu
89
Identyfikator DOI
Liczba arkuszy
1,
Autorzy
(liczba autorów: 6)
Pozostali autorzy
+ 5
Słowa kluczowe
EN
Social workers
Role playing games
Dungeons & Dragons
Streszczenia
Język
EN
Treść
Whereas role-playing and table-top role-play games (RPGs) have been proven to have potential as therapeutic tools, playing RPGs is often stereotypically associated with social incompetence and psychiatric disorders. Knowledge regarding the stereotype and its implications is very scarce specifically among mental health practitioners. Therefore the present study aimed to narrow this gap in knowledge by examining the perception of Social Workers that are considered to be the forefront of mental health-care, in regard to the association between playing RPGs and mental health. A convenience sample of 130 Social Workers, recruited through social networks (e.g. Facebook, WhatsApp etc.), responded to an on-line survey dealing with their perception of their own knowledge on RPGs, the importance of such knowledge and the association between playing RPGs and mental illness. Results indicated an association between having higher knowledge of RPGs and lower perception of a link between playing RPGs and psychopathology. The study’s findings emphasize the false stigma and its potential harmful implication on professionals’ practice, especially in the context of intake process and primary diagnostic. The effect of familiarity is also discussed in light of the study’s findings.
Inne
System-identifier
126544
CrossrefMetadata from Crossref logo
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