Lack of support for Rensch's rule in an intraspecific test using red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) populations
PBN-AR
Instytucja
Wydział Biologii (Uniwersytet Jagielloński w Krakowie)
Informacje podstawowe
Główny język publikacji
EN
Czasopismo
Insect Science (35pkt w roku publikacji)
ISSN
1672-9609
EISSN
1744-7917
Wydawca
DOI
URL
Rok publikacji
2017
Numer zeszytu
1
Strony od-do
133-140
Numer tomu
24
Link do pełnego tekstu
Identyfikator DOI
Liczba arkuszy
Autorzy
(liczba autorów: 5)
Pozostali autorzy
+ 4
Słowa kluczowe
EN
allometry
body size
Coleoptera
sexual selection
sexual size dimorphism
Tenebrionidae
Streszczenia
Język
EN
Treść
Rensch’s rule proposes a universal allometric scaling phenomenon across species where sexual size dimorphism (SSD) has evolved: in taxa with male-biased dimorphism, degree of SSD should increasewith overall body size, and in taxawith female-biased dimorphism, degree of SSD should decrease with increasing average body size. Rensch’s rule appears to hold widely across taxa where SSD is male-biased, but not consistently when SSD is female-biased. Furthermore, studies addressing this question within species are rare, so it remains unclear whether this rule applies at the intraspecific level.We assess body size and SSD within Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), a species where females are larger than males, using 21 populations derived from separate locations across the world, and maintained in isolated laboratory culture for at least 20 years. Body size, and hence SSD patterns, are highly susceptible to variations in temperature, diet quality and other environmental factors. Crucially, here we nullify interference of such confounds as all populations were maintained under identical conditions (similar densities, standard diet and exposed to identical temperature, relative humidity and photoperiod). We measured thirty beetles of each sex for all populations, and found body size variation across populations, and (as expected) female-biased SSD in all populations. We test whether Rensch’s rule holds for our populations, but find isometry, i.e. no allometry for SSD. Our results thus show that Rensch’s rule does not hold across populations within this species. Our intraspecific test matches previous interspecific studies showing that Rensch’s rule fails in species with female-biased SSD.
Cechy publikacji
original-article
peer-reviewed
Inne
System-identifier
56612
CrossrefMetadata from Crossref logo
Cytowania
Liczba prac cytujących tę pracę
Brak danych
Referencje
Liczba prac cytowanych przez tę pracę
Brak danych